The final season of Game of Thrones is currently airing. The long anticipated conclusion to the epic battle over The Iron Throne — rule over the Seven Kingdoms of Westeros.

Consider the “final episode” (don’t worry, this is all made up, no spoilers here): The last battle is upon us; The northern armies led by the Starks approach the battlefield; the armies of Daenerys are there too; and so are the Lannister armies, led by Cersei. John Snow, ever the responsible adult, proposes an alternative: “Instead of bloodshed, why don’t we just have a democratic election?” Everybody nods in agreement…


The final season of Game of Thrones is currently airing. The long anticipated conclusion to the epic battle over The Iron Throne — rule over the Seven Kingdoms of Westeros.

Consider the “final episode” (don’t worry, this is all made up, no spoilers here): The last battle is upon us; The northern armies led by the Starks approach the battlefield; the armies of Daenerys are there too; and so are the Lannister armies, led by Cersei. John Snow, ever the responsible adult, proposes an alternative: “Instead of bloodshed, why don’t we just have a democratic election?” Everybody nods in agreement…


Trying to unlock mainstream adoption for public blockchain is one of the hardest challenges in the industry today. Real businesses are yet to see the value in public blockchain technology and adoption crawls. I believe this is largely caused by the blockchain dichotomy: The polarization of infrastructure solutions in the industry today. If this indeed is the cause, we can design architectures around it. Will this be enough to make mainstream adoption possible?

There’s a feeling in the industry that blockchain is slow to deliver on its promise. The impact of this technology on the world is still small. …


Trying to unlock mainstream adoption for public blockchain is one of the hardest challenges in the industry today. Real businesses are yet to see the value in public blockchain technology and adoption crawls. I believe this is largely caused by the blockchain dichotomy: The polarization of infrastructure solutions in the industry today. If this indeed is the cause, we can design architectures around it. Will this be enough to make mainstream adoption possible?

There’s a feeling in the industry that blockchain is slow to deliver on its promise. The impact of this technology on the world is still small. …


There’s little argument that open source has transformed our world. As a developer, I cannot recall a single day in the last few years where I did not rely on open source software. I’m not the exception. The majority of software engineers today rely on open source daily in their professional lives.

For one, open source is dominating developer infrastructure. From operating systems (Linux in the cloud) to databases (MySQL, MongoDB, Redis) to programming languages themselves (JavaScript, Python, Java, C, PHP). It’s not just developers, it’s consumers as well. …


The purpose of this short post is to give a high level introduction to the Orbs Universe and its proof-of-stake ecosystem. This post will not go into the specifics of the mechanics and will not go into exact numbers (this information is available here). Instead, we’ll focus on motivation and the main idea.

The ideas in this post are simplified to make the model easier to understand. The following posts on the topic go into the specifics in a more precise and accurate way.

Validators

Validators play an essential role in the Orbs network. They operate the Orbs nodes, run the…


The blockchain industry makes heavy use of buzzwords. Terms like “public” and “private” are thrown around but what do they actually mean? Is this the right way to define a blockchain? Does a private blockchain really exist? Maybe we should even take one step back and ask — what is a blockchain, actually?

The need for concrete definitions

How do you define blockchain?

This sounds like a funny question, but try asking it 10 different industry experts and you will probably get 10 different answers. Is there even one correct answer? Maybe the better question should be “what does blockchain mean for you?”

It is…


There’s little argument that open source has transformed our world. As a developer, I cannot recall a single day in the last few years where I did not rely on open source software. I’m not the exception. The majority of software engineers today rely on open source daily in their professional lives.

For one, open source is dominating developer infrastructure. From operating systems (Linux in the cloud) to databases (MySQL, MongoDB, Redis) to programming languages themselves (JavaScript, Python, Java, C, PHP). It’s not just developers, it’s consumers as well. …


Watch the video:

Talk given by Tal Kol (48 minutes)

Introducing the Orbs Contributor Series

Orbs is a decentralized public blockchain where open source plays a key part. Our goal is to expand the Orbs ecosystem as much as possible and onboard as many contributors to the project as possible. A truly decentralized project is one where any individual is able to contribute.

Making a project open source is not enough. Open source is more than mechanics, it’s about culture. This culture starts by open sourcing the Orbs protocol specifications, which enables every individual to understand the details of how the system works. It continues with open sourcing…


Working with Node.js, I’ve grown to rely on Lodash as an invaluable tool. It completes the JavaScript standard library with a set of handy functional operators over collections. I can’t recall a single JavaScript project I’ve worked on in recent years that hasn’t used it.

My experience of switching to Go has been very pleasant. Go resolves many of the issues I’ve had with Node.js over the years and yet remains as productive. I’ve been sorely missing one thing though — a library like Lodash.

What’s so great about Lodash?

JavaScript isn’t a purely functional language, and most of the code I write in JavaScript…

Tal Kol

Public blockchain for the real world. Founder at Orbs.com. React fan. Ex Wix.com head of mobile engineering. Ex Kin by Kik head of engineering.

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